Earth & Sky

Above, light from the rising sun illuminates large boulders on a hilltop in the Davis Mountains of western Texas.

The oldest entry in my blog was posted five years ago today, and tells of a spot in the mountains which is very special to me. The Pontiac and I have enjoyed five tours of these beautiful and peaceful mountains during the past 30 years; I’ve no doubt we’ll be visiting the area again.

Speaking of, here are links to a few archived blog posts about our most recent trip to the Davis Mountains in 2015…

The long-awaited return to the spot mentioned in the post linked above, including some photos of the incredible night sky:

Deep in the Heart of Texas

And a couple of posts featuring photos of the area’s wildlife:

Raptor’s Delight

Acme Little Giant Do-It-Yourself Rocket-Sled Kit

Valley Abstract

All of the digital infrared images taken during my first visit to the Buffalo Peaks Ranch have now been posted. Two years after that trip, I returned to the ranch with an assortment of long-expired rolls of 35mm film, just to see what they would do. One of those rolls—Kodak Infrared film—was as old as my car.

I wasn’t expecting much from the IR experiment, but the results were ghostly and surreal, with strange artifacts and black skies; looked as though the photos had been taken during the night. Only a few of the frames contained anything resembling a photograph. Here, you can barely make out the shadowy figure of Sarah (right below the sun) heading up the trail to the South Platte River.

South Park, Colorado
Kodak Infrared film (expired 1971)

First Light over Texas

Whenever I’m in the vicinity of Culberson County, it’s a sure bet that I’ll be making several trips up and down all 55 miles of my favorite highway, Texas State Highway 54. During my most recent visit, I decided to see how it looked in the twilight of dawn. So, I rolled out of Van Horn while it was still dark and drove north, enjoying, as usual, the complete absence of other vehicles.

Texas 54 terminates at the base of the Guadalupe Mountains, the highest terrain in the state. It was wonderful to see the mountains aglow as the sun cracked the horizon.

Sundown

In addition to our usual pre-dawn arrival each day at the Buffalo Peaks Ranch this past October, we picked one afternoon to return for our first look at the ranch glowing under the light of the low western sun. The mood was quite different, and there was much excitement as we ran around and clicked away at all of the wonderful new presentations of light and shadow. We stayed until the sun fell behind the distant mountains.

Ilford SFX 200 film

Buffalo Peaks Ranch
South Park, Colorado

Ranch Dreams

A transequatorial double-exposure collaboration with my friend John, who lives in New South Wales, Australia. This roll of Rollei Ortho 25 black & white negative film was first exposed during my most recent visit to the Buffalo Peaks Ranch in South Park, Colorado; the frames below feature Jay, Sarah and my shadow. The film was then shipped to John, who went shooting near his home with an eye toward light and texture. We’re quite happy with the way the roll turned out.