Stinesville 1984

Working on assignments for my college photography courses was a great excuse to tour the country roads and small towns of southern Indiana in my ’57 Ford Fairlane. I shot plenty of Kodak Tri-X in the process—the first rolls of film I ever developed by hand.

Not long ago, while viewing those contact sheets for the first time in many years, I was trying to determine exactly which towns I had photographed, as I had made no notes. In one frame, I found signs containing the name Gosport; after that, shots of a bridge and a river. Moving chronologically through the roll, and with the help of Google Maps, I learned that I had gone south out of Gosport and the next town I came to was Stinesville. Google Street View confirmed it.

For decades, these photos existed only on the contact sheet. Recently, I ran some of the old negatives through my film scanner, and after enlarging the images on my monitor, I found details that I had never noticed before, such as the dog starting across the street at the bottom of the hill in the photo above.

The old buildings on Main Street are still standing, although the cars in the Google imagery are certainly different from the ones seen here.

If you look at Railroad Street (below) in Stinesville today, you’ll notice that the train tracks and telegraph poles have all been removed…

Another detail that I had never noticed prior to scanning the negatives: two kids walking near the base of the pine tree by the Stinesville Baptist Church. Neither the church nor the tree are standing there today…

(Click on any photo to bring up a larger version in a new tab.)

1984
Stinesville, Indiana
Kodak Tri-X 35mm film

Nature, Preserving Itself

Well, five years have gone by and a few more inches of aluminum have been ingested by this old oak tree, living its life in super-slow motion (or, maybe we’re living too fast).

Being in a nature preserve, I imagine this tree will live and die right where it stands. But should this oak ever make its way to a lumber mill, the saw operator is in for a big surprise.

I’ll visit again in 2023. Stay tuned.

Fun with Film

Something I’ve enjoyed greatly over the last few years is collaborating with friends around the world to create multiple-exposure photographs using 35mm film. After I exposed this roll of Adox Silvermax 100, I mailed it to my friend John in Australia, who gave it a second pass with his camera. It’s especially rewarding when you keep each other in the dark regarding the scenes that you captured, and finally see the happy accidents that result.

You can learn more by visiting the Swap-Stop International website.

(My thanks to John and Walter for making this possible.)

Heavy Metal

Looks like our long winter is finally history. A late start to the 2018 driving season, but I’ll take it. Sure was wonderful to spend several hours out on country roads today, driving in no particular direction.

Grain Beats Pixels

Before cell phones were smart, and before I owned a DSLR, I carried one of those crude pocket digital cameras; you remember…the kind with a max resolution of 640 x 480. Found the shot above, featuring my dad’s Stetson hat, in my archive.

Below: same car, different hat. Once I found that old digital image, I remembered this frame in my negative library. Love the grain on this 3200 film. As far as I can tell, this is the first self-portrait I ever shot with the LeMans…probably less than a year after I purchased it. Parked here between Highway 1 and a seaside cliff, the Pacific booming right below me. This spot is just a short walk from my favorite coastal hiking ground, as described in this post.

Kodak T-MAX P3200 film

Marin County, California
1991

 

 

27 Years

Happy to report that the rain paused long enough for me to enjoy an anniversary drive this weekend. As an added bonus, the young crescent moon popped out from behind the clouds just as the ride ended.

By the way, these aren’t lakes…they’re flooded cornfields. Been a rainy, rainy, rainy few months here.