Fun with Film

Something I’ve enjoyed greatly over the last few years is collaborating with friends around the world to create multiple-exposure photographs using 35mm film. After I exposed this roll of Adox Silvermax 100, I mailed it to my friend John in Australia, who gave it a second pass with his camera. It’s especially rewarding when you keep each other in the dark regarding the scenes that you captured, and finally see the happy accidents that result.

You can learn more by visiting the Swap-Stop International website.

(My thanks to John and Walter for making this possible.)

A Last Look at the Boreal Forest

Before we head back to lower latitudes and enjoy the scenery of southern Alberta and Saskatchewan, here are some final images from the far north:

Old wood, being reclaimed by the forest…

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No shortage of abandoned mines in the north country…

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Some of the forest’s smaller residents…

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Something with wings…

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Speaking of wings, the ravens were everywhere, and always on the lookout for a free meal. Though I never fed them, they stalked me constantly, and I couldn’t wander far from the car if the top was down; I could tell that this one was just waiting for me to turn around so he could hop in and steal my crackers…

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Another waterfall: Alexandra Falls, on the Hay River…

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The gorge below…

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Nature’s masonry skills on display…

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So many trees…

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Where the Trails Don’t Go

The opportunity to roam freely in the wilderness is, unfortunately, a rare occurrence is this country. One is usually relegated to established trails in established parks, and to sharing those trails with other visitors. That takes a lot of the “wild” out of the experience. But once in a while, I get lucky enough to meet a landowner who will let me wander across his property to enjoy the unspoiled scenery and genuine silence. That happened this week in eastern Montana. Here are a few images from that excursion…

I love it when the evening sunlight finds that one special pine cone…

 

“On the High Edge of Texas”

You are looking at the Guadalupe Mountains of west Texas. The title for this post comes from Edward Abbey, who described his experiences in these mountains in the book Beyond the Wall: Essays from the Outside. In October of 2015, I logged my fifth visit to the area, and my first visit to the summit of Guadalupe Peak, the highest point in Texas at 8,751′. The 4.2 mile trail to the summit ascends 3,000′ above the desert floor.

The photo above was taken at sunrise on the day before my hike, during a morning joyride on my favorite highway, which, I’m happy to say, I drove from one end to the other five full times during the week.

The following morning, I arrived at the trailhead by dawn, hoping to conquer as much of the trail as possible before the sun reached the broiling point.

About twenty minutes into the hike, the sun joined the party…

One of the “exposed” sections of the trail; probably a little more harrowing when the rock is wet, or when gale-force winds batter the mountain, which they often do…

Looking north toward Hunter Peak…

The sun climbs higher…

Dead sea creatures: The Guadalupe Mountains are the exposed portion of the Capitan Reef which “loomed over the floor of the Delaware Sea 260 to 265 million years ago…”

The American Airlines monument at the summit, erected in 1958…

Looking down on El Capitan
(Follow this link to a 43-second video showing a panoramic view of the desert from this spot.)

Greetings from Texas…

At the summit: The highest caterpillar in Texas…

Ladybug convention…

Trail buddy…

Have you been living under a rock?

Assorted flora found on the trail…

The Guadalupe Mountains are a hiker’s paradise. Be sure to pay them a visit if you have the chance.