Rust

Weeds catch the early morning sun on the plains of Colorado.

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The Hall of the Mountain King

As high as the Pontiac has ever been, or ever will be: 14,130 feet (4307 m) above sea level. The Mount Evans Scenic Byway is the highest paved road on the North American continent. Due to the likelihood of heavy snow at that elevation, the road is open only from Memorial Day through Labor Day. Since I’ve never been a fan of summer travel, I pushed it as late as possible and made my ascent on Labor Day, September 7, 1998.

I rose early and left the town of Idaho Springs well before sunrise. There was some delay getting on the road because the Pontiac did not want to start in that cold, thin air. I was able to get it going by removing the air filter and wedging open the choke plate with a screwdriver. If Idaho Springs (elevation 7526 feet) was a problem, then starting the car at the top of mountain would be even more challenging. So I left the engine running during the entire trip up and down Mount Evans.

Winding my way up the mountain in the cold and the dark, I was watching closely for deer and other beasts, and hoping that the Pontiac could handle the climb. Traffic was limited to just two or three other vehicles. I arrived at the entrance gate a few minutes before they opened for business that day, and made it to the parking area as the sun was coming up. Standing in the cool, clear, still air, I marveled at the view of the sun rising over the rugged terrain far below, and at the mountain’s long shadow extending for many miles to the west.

The wide-angle lens used here was junked right after this roll was developed, as it had quit working properly and was seriously over-exposing each frame (these black & white photos required heavy digital manipulation). Happily, the cheap disposable camera I had purchased at a gas station was there to save the day…

It would have been a shame to get this close to the summit and not finish the journey. As one who lives near sea level, I’m glad I had asked my doctor for an oxygen prescription so I could buy a tank for trips like this. On went the mask and I set out for the top of Mount Evans. This was my very first attempt at physical activity above 10,000 feet. Though only a 135-foot climb from the parking lot to the summit, it didn’t take long to learn that I needed to move slowly at this elevation.

I did stand—briefly—on that highest rock, but even with the O2, I had trouble balancing there. To date, this remains the highest point I have ever visited: 14,265 feet (4348 m).

Wish I had put the top down before taking these photos of the Pontiac; at least it was lowered for the sunny ride back down the mountain.

Ilford FP4 film
Kodak Gold 400 film

First Light over Texas

Whenever I’m in the vicinity of Culberson County, it’s a sure bet that I’ll be making several trips up and down all 55 miles of my favorite highway, Texas State Highway 54. During my most recent visit, I decided to see how it looked in the twilight of dawn. So, I rolled out of Van Horn while it was still dark and drove north, enjoying, as usual, the complete absence of other vehicles.

Texas 54 terminates at the base of the Guadalupe Mountains, the highest terrain in the state. It was wonderful to see the mountains aglow as the sun cracked the horizon.

Down on the Farm

This morning, my road trip brought me to a natural oasis within a sea of development. There, I found photographer Gary Bowen. With our cameras at the ready, we enjoyed a frosty sunrise hike through the Metzger Farm Open Space in Westminster, Colorado. Though we didn’t spot the coyotes today, there were plenty of birds out and about, and lots of color. Be sure to check out Gary’s wonderful photographs featuring the many inhabitants of this preserve.

Grebe…

Great blue heron…

Magpie with a cattail…

The resident kingfisher, and his friend, a northern flicker…

Harvest Moon 2017

South Dakota never disappoints when it comes to viewing the Harvest Moon. This was the scene Thursday evening in the rangeland east of Rapid City…

While waiting for the moon to come up, I caught this beautiful sunset over the Black Hills…

2 for 1: I started my day with a bonus Harvest Moon sighting just 12 hours earlier, setting over the hills to the west of Rapid City…

I ask the moon for orchids
She said, “How ’bout a drop of blood from a rolling stone?”
She never fails to tickle my funny bone

“Burn Card”
The Barr Brothers