Great Dreams from Heaven

A wonderful spot for standing still and listening to the wind. The title above comes from an old tune recorded by, among others, guitarist Mike Bloomfield. Speaking of, here’s a Vimeo link to a video that I recorded a short distance from this spot while driving northward, if you’d care to see more of this marvelous terrain. (Video duration: 2:43)

Little Missouri National Grassland, North Dakota

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Rise of the Hunter’s Moon

Some men go crazy
Some men go slow
Some men go just where they want
Some men never go

“Shame on the Moon”
Rodney Crowell

As captured last week on the plains of western Minnesota (single exposure).

Salvaged

Other than two very hot days last week, this year’s trip is already ahead of previous adventures in miles driven with the top up, due to plenty of cold, wet and foggy weather in the Great Plains. As this morning’s first 100 miles revealed more of the same, I decided to rewind a good portion of the miles I gained yesterday by turning back to the southwest. Just past Haswell, Colorado, the fog and the rain finally lifted and I caught a welcome glimpse of sun and blue sky. Time to drop the top.

I continued south into Colorado’s Comanche National Grassland (the third grassland of the trip thus far; at least three more grasslands to come in the weeks ahead).

This is a truly beautiful and peaceful area. And today, I had it all to myself…except for about two dozen pronghorns, which ran across the road as I approached, and this tarantula, which was intent on crawling under my car. I waited until she emerged from the other side before driving off.

A spectacular view of the best part of my Sunday. The only sounds I heard while in the grassland came from insects, birds and the wind.

You can watch a short video recorded from this vantage point by following this link to Vimeo.

The Hall of the Mountain King

As high as the Pontiac has ever been, or ever will be: 14,130 feet (4307 m) above sea level. The Mount Evans Scenic Byway is the highest paved road on the North American continent. Due to the likelihood of heavy snow at that elevation, the road is open only from Memorial Day through Labor Day. Since I’ve never been a fan of summer travel, I pushed it as late as possible and made my ascent on Labor Day, September 7, 1998.

I rose early and left the town of Idaho Springs well before sunrise. There was some delay getting on the road because the Pontiac did not want to start in that cold, thin air. I was able to get it going by removing the air filter and wedging open the choke plate with a screwdriver. If Idaho Springs (elevation 7526 feet) was a problem, then starting the car at the top of mountain would be even more challenging. So I left the engine running during the entire trip up and down Mount Evans.

Winding my way up the mountain in the cold and the dark, I was watching closely for deer and other beasts, and hoping that the Pontiac could handle the climb. Traffic was limited to just two or three other vehicles. I arrived at the entrance gate a few minutes before they opened for business that day, and made it to the parking area as the sun was coming up. Standing in the cool, clear, still air, I marveled at the view of the sun rising over the rugged terrain far below, and at the mountain’s long shadow extending for many miles to the west.

The wide-angle lens used here was junked right after this roll was developed, as it had quit working properly and was seriously over-exposing each frame (these black & white photos required heavy digital manipulation). Happily, the cheap disposable camera I had purchased at a gas station was there to save the day…

It would have been a shame to get this close to the summit and not finish the journey. As one who lives near sea level, I’m glad I had asked my doctor for an oxygen prescription so I could buy a tank for trips like this. On went the mask and I set out for the top of Mount Evans. This was my very first attempt at physical activity above 10,000 feet. Though only a 135-foot climb from the parking lot to the summit, it didn’t take long to learn that I needed to move slowly at this elevation.

I did stand—briefly—on that highest rock, but even with the O2, I had trouble balancing there. To date, this remains the highest point I have ever visited: 14,265 feet (4348 m).

Wish I had put the top down before taking these photos of the Pontiac; at least it was lowered for the sunny ride back down the mountain.

Ilford FP4 film
Kodak Gold 400 film

Ranch Dreams

A transequatorial double-exposure collaboration with my friend John, who lives in New South Wales, Australia. This roll of Rollei Ortho 25 black & white negative film was first exposed during my most recent visit to the Buffalo Peaks Ranch in South Park, Colorado; the frames below feature Jay, Sarah and my shadow. The film was then shipped to John, who went shooting near his home with an eye toward light and texture. We’re quite happy with the way the roll turned out.